Cockatoo Care

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Cockatoo Care was introduced in September 2001 as a joint initiative of the Water Corporation and the Western Australian Museum.

Female Carnaby’s Cockatoo at nest hollow

Female Carnaby’s Cockatoo at nest hollow
Image copyright Keith Lightbody

The objectives of the program have been to research the distribution and ecology of Carnaby's, Baudin's and Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoos and threats to their survival, and to implement measures to encourage the conservation of these birds. This has been through habitat enhancement including the development of artificial nest boxes and tubes, feral bee research and community education and involvement.

Since the popular program's inception it has achieved many notable successes in terms of vital research and raising public awareness of the risks these declining cockatoo populations face, including the loss of feeding and breeding habitat, impact of fire and of feral European honeybees, climate change and farming practices.

Show image caption Cockatoo Care research - measuring a Carnaby's chick

Cockatoo Care research - measuring a Carnaby's chick
Image copyright Kim Sarti, WA Museum 

The work of Cockatoo Care led to the conservation status of the Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoo and Baudin's Cockatoo being upgraded to endangered by the Department of Parks and Wildlife and the establishment of recovery teams. These are the first important steps in ensuring that population improvement programs are implemented to conserve these precious birds. Research into the breeding biology of all three species has continued throughout the southwest of WA.

Recent Studies

Conserving prevailing usage of the species names Calyptorhynchus baudinii Lear, 1832 and Calyptorhynchus latirostris Carnaby, 1948, long established for two endemic cockatoos in south-western Australia by designating a neotype for Calyptorhynchus baudinii Lear, E. (1832) – ICZN Case 3658.

The breeding biology of the Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus banksii naso Gould in south-western Australia. I. Characteristics of nest trees and nest hollows. Pacific Conservation Biology.

The breeding biology of the Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus banksii naso Gould in south-western Australia. II. Breeding Behaviour and diet. Pacific Conservation Biology.

Trials on the use and effectiveness of artificial nest hollows for Carnaby’s Cockatoo at Cataby, Western Australia. Western Australian Naturalist.

Contact calls of Baudin’s Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus baudinii. Western Australian Naturalist.

Black Cockatoos on the Swan Coastal Plain - report for the Department of Planning, Western Australia

Cockatoos in the media

Rare bird hatches in suburban Perth

Reporting Cockatoo Deaths

If you suspect black cockatoos are being shot or illegally harmed or captured, please telephone Department of Parks and Wildlife 24hr Hotline on (08) 9474 9055. See download below for translated information.

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Reporting bird deaths - translated323.6 KB