A behind-the-scenes look at our crustacean collection

Photo Galleries | Updated 2 months ago

A freshwater crayfish specimenFreshwater crayfish which belongs to the species Cherax preissi, commonly known as Koonac
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A rock lobster specimenRock lobster which belongs to the species Panulirus cygnus, commonly known as Western Rock Lobster
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A rock lobster specimenRock lobster in the wild which belongs to the species Panulirus versicolor
Image copyright WA Museum
A rock lobster specimenRock lobster which belongs to the species Jasus edwardsii, commonly known as Southern Rock Lobster
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A slipper lobster specimenSlipper lobster which belongs to the species Thenus australiensis, commonly known as Moreton Bay Bug or Northern Shovel-nosed lobster
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A slipper lobster specimenSlipper lobster which belongs to the species Ibacus peronii, commonly known as Balmain Bug or Southern Shovel-nosed lobster
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A scampi specimenScampi, also known as Norwegian lobster, which belongs to the genus Metanephrops
Image copyright WA Museum
A squat lobster specimenSquat lobster which belongs to the species Allogalathea elegans, commonly known as the Feather Star Squat Lobster, Crinoid Squat Lobster or Elegant Squat Lobster
Image copyright WA Museum
A squat lobster specimenSquat lobster which belongs to the genus Galathea; photographed in Browse Island, WA
Image copyright WA Museum
A squat lobster specimenSquat lobster which belongs to the genus Uroptychus; photographed at Rob Roy Reefs, Kimberley region, WA
Image copyright WA Museum
A blind lobster specimenBlind lobster
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A freshwater crayfish specimenFreshwater crayfish which belongs to the species Cherax tenuimnus, commonly known as Marron
Image copyright WA Museum

This small photo gallery gives a behind-the-scenes look into the crustacean collection. It will be enhanced in the near future with a Smartphone and tablet app that the Western Australian Museum is currently developing. This Smartphone and tablet app will reveal what happens behind-the-scenes at the Museum, explaining the research performed and showcasing our collections.

The Western Australian Museum is developing a variety of new products for our audiences, and invites you to give your opinion about this app project by answering a short survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/wam-science-app

Thank you for your contribution.