A behind-the-scenes look at our butterfly collection

Photo Galleries | Updated 2 years ago

A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; underside of a Belenois java teutonia, family Pieridae; commonly known as Caper White
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian swallowtail butterfly specimenNative Australian swallowtail butterfly; species Papilio anactus, family Papilionidae; commonly known as Dainty Swallowtail
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian swallowtail butterfly specimenNative Australian swallowtail butterfly; species Graphium sarpedon choredon, family Papilionidae; commonly known as Blue Triangle
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; species Catopsilia scylla etesia, family Pieridae; commonly known as Orange Migrant
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; species Delias aganippe, family Pieridae; commonly known as Red-spotted Jezebel or Wood White Butterfly
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
Nine introduced butterfly specimensIntroduced butterflies; species Danaus plexippus plexippus, family Nymphalidae; commonly known as Monarch or Wanderer
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
Several introduced butterfly specimens in their storage boxIntroduced and Native Australian butterflies; in the foreground, species Danaus affinis affinis, family Nymphalidae; commonly known as Black and White Tiger or Swamp Tiger
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; female specimen from the species Hypolimnas bolina nerina, family Nymphalidae; also known as Common Eggfly
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
Several native Australian butterfly specimens in their storage boxNative Australian butterflies; in the foreground, species Oreixenica lathoniella, family Nymphalidae
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; underside of a Hypochrysops apelles apelles, family Lycaenidae; commonly known as Copper Jewel
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; underside of a Hypochrysops halyaetus, family Lycaenidae; commonly known as Turquoise Jewel
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign swallowtail butterfly; species Papilio ulysses autolycus, family Papilionidae; commonly known as Ulysses Butterfly or Blue Mountain Swallowtail
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign birdwing butterfly; male specimen from the species Ornithoptera paradisea paradisea, family Papilionidae; commonly known as Paradise Birdwing
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign butterfly; species Ideopsis gaura daos, family Nymphalidae; commonly known as Smaller Wood Nymph
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign butterfly; species Moduza procris milonia, family Nymphalidae; commonly known as The Commander
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign butterfly; Cyrestis acilia gades, family Nymphalidae
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A foreign butterfly specimenForeign butterfly; Hebomoia glaucippe aturia, family Pieridae; commonly known as Great Orange Tip
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum
A native Australian butterfly specimenNative Australian butterfly; species Arhopala micale amytis, family Lycaenidae; also known as Common Oak-blue
Photo by Jessica Scholle, image copyright WA Museum

This small photo gallery gives a behind-the-scenes look into the butterfly collection. It will be enhanced in the near future with a Smartphone and tablet app that the Western Australian Museum is currently developing. This Smartphone and tablet app will aim to reveal what happens behind-the-scenes at the Museum, explaining the research performed and showcasing our collections.

The Western Australian Museum is always aiming to offer products that our audiences want, and invites you to give your opinion about this app project by answering a short survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/wam-science-app

Thank you for your contribution.