What's New

  • Five of the largest diamonds from the Argyle pink diamond collection, Kimberley, Western Australia

    16 Feb 2015

    A behind-the-scenes look at our mineral collection

    The Western Australian Museum mineral collections contain around 30,800 specimens of some 1,300 mineral species from more than 10,000 localities in Australia and the rest of the world. This photo gallery showcases some specimens from this large collection. 

    Further Information

    To find out more on the Western Australian Museum mineral collection, visit the collection hightlights on the Museum website.

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    Photo Galleries
    Jessica Scholle

  • Image of an orange-yellow sea star photographed near Cassini Island, Kimberley

    11 Feb 2015

    Amazing Sea Stars

    Nothing scares seastars. A prey too large for their tiny mouth? No problem, they eject their stomach from their body.  A damaged arm? No worries, they regenerate a new limb!

    Varying in shape and size, and often brightly coloured, seastars are loved by children and prised by collectors; but do you really know what they are? Let’s take a look at these surprising aquatic animals.

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • Fossil shell which belongs to the extinct species Miltha hamptonensis

    9 Feb 2015

    A behind-the-scenes look at our Roe Calcarenite fossil collection

    About 3 million years ago the Leeuwin Current flowed strongly, warming the waters along the south-west Australian coast to such an extent that mangroves flourished and corals grew. This warm sea also supported rich molluscan faunas. Nearly 600 species are known from a thin limestone called the Roe Calcarenite which outcrops on the Roe Plains. Because of their recent age about two-thirds of the species are still living today, although some are now found in warmer waters to the north.

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    Photo Galleries
    Jessica Scholle

  • Image of a Red-back spider sitting on a leaf

    6 Feb 2015

    Redback spider bite - what to do

    Redback spiders (Latrodectus hasseltii) are extremely common in Australia, and are often found in considerable numbers around houses and other buildings in many towns and cities in Western Australia. They rarely bite humans, and when disturbed, they usually try to escape or feign death by curling its legs and dropping to the ground.

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of a micromollusc. Woodside Collection Project (2009-2014)

    6 Feb 2015

    West Coast Marine Molluscs

    Western Australia (WA) has a unique and diverse marine fauna. You may have noticed, walking along our beaches, a wide variety of seashells. Who do these shells belong to? And how do they survive? 

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of a live Baler Shell moving along the ocean floor.

    4 Feb 2015

    Scientific investigations on Baler shells

    The Western Australian Museum is performing research on Baler shells to determine how many different species occur in our waters and to better understand their distribution around the country.

    The Baler shell is a large marine mollusc that belongs to the gastropod family Volutidae (volute shells). Of the 200 species of volutes distributed worldwide, around 70 are known from Australia. Many of those from Western Australian are endemic, found nowhere else in the world.

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • Native Australian butterfly; underside of a Belenois java teutonia, family Pieridae; commonly known as Caper White

    2 Feb 2015

    A behind-the-scenes look at our butterfly collection

    Butterflies are a group of insects which belong to the order Lepidoptera and include about 17,950 species. Of the 400 butterfly species distributed in Australia, approximately half are endemic, found nowhere else in the world.

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    Photo Galleries
    Jessica Scholle

  • Bushland at Bungendore Park

    30 Jan 2015

    Bungendore Park

    Bungendore Park is an area of natural Jarrah-Marri bushland, and is part of Wungong Regional Park, located on the edge of the Darling Scarp.

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    Photo Galleries
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of an atoll in the ocean

    27 Jan 2015

    Bird capture and release story

    This is a bird capture and release story told by the Western Australian Museum's Curator of Ornithology Ron Johnstone. Thousands of kilometres from the Western Australian coast, shipwrecked sailors tagged a giant petrel. The bird flew to Western Australia and the note was found. Listen below to hear what happens next: 

     

     

     

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • Calosoma schayeri, Native Australian beetle which belongs to the family Carabidae, subfamily Carabinae

    23 Jan 2015

    A behind-the-scenes look at our beetle collection

    The Coleoptera, commonly called beetles, are by far the largest order of insects. More than 420,000 species are described worldwide, making up about 40% of all known insects species and almost 25% of all known animals. This large order includes diving beetles, ladybugs, stag beetles, weevils and ground beetles. Beetles occur in all terrestrial habitats including dry regions, tropical forests and freshwater or beach environments, except in the Polar Regions.

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    Photo Galleries
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of the brown-grey meteorite Nakhla, on display the WA Museum.

    23 Jan 2015

    How do we know where meteorites come from?

    Meteorites are solid pieces of natural space debris that do not completely disintegrate during their descent through the atmosphere. Available evidence and research suggest most meteorites appear to be fragments of asteroids in solar orbits between Mars and Jupiter, but some meteorites also originate from Mars and the Moon. Today, seventy meteorites are recognised to have come from the planet Mars. In its collections, the Western Australian Museum contains samples of three Martian meteorites and two samples of lunar meteorites. 

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • Reveal WAM logo

    20 Jan 2015

    Reveal WAM - about our latest app

    The Western Australian Museum (WAM) has released a new app: Reveal WAM.

    WAM Online Services Designer Danny Murphy explains that the idea for this app came from a simple wish to ‘make our content work harder’.

    This app is about giving our users the ability to view our content however they want, whether on an RSS feed, a mobile device or the website.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of an Orb-weaving spider in its web

    19 Jan 2015

    The spider that weaves gold

    Often mistaken for a dangerous creature, the Australian golden orb-weaving spider is in fact harmless to humans. They have a dark-brown carapace (the “head”), a cream coloured abdomen, and yellow banded legs. Males are very small, and are often difficult to locate in the web of the female. They occur all over Australia, building large webs with yellow silk which shine like gold in sunlight. 

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    Article
    Western Australian Museum

  • An unusual spider like creature perched on a rock

    15 Jan 2015

    About the Whip Spider

    In 2013, the Western Australian Museum released a recording of a whip spider (below) collected in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. The footage shows the arachnid motioning slowly with its thin whip-like legs, which might remind you of a flag signaller going through a semaphore routine or a (very slow) whip cracker.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image of mounted tahr trophy head prepared by Theobald Bros

    9 Dec 2014

    Moving the old to prepare for the New – Museum!

    History of the mammal collection

    The Mammal Gallery has been an icon of the Western Australian Museum – Perth for many years. Anyone who has visited the Museum, no matter how long ago, remembers the amazing bulk of ‘Big Bill’ the Bison, and many other examples of skilful taxidermy. We are currently performing conservation and treatment works on this exhibition ready for the New Museum, which opens in 2020.

    Some early specimen conservation works have already commenced.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • Paul Doughty giving a lecture at a lectern

    9 Dec 2014

    Wet and Wild: Frogs of the Kimberley

    Presented by Dr Paul Doughty, Curator of Herpetology, Western Australian Museum.

    Part of the WA Museum’s 2014 In the Wild West Lecture Series

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    Video
    Western Australian Museum

  • Dr Ian D. MacLeod standing at a lectern giving a presentation

    28 Nov 2014

    Rock art conservation: impact of microclimates on reactions of the environment with the engravings

    Presented by Dr Ian D. MacLeod, Executive Director, Fremantle Museums and Collections, Western Australian Maritime Museum

    Part of the WA Museum’s 2014 In the Wild West Lecture Series.

    The remarkable rock engravings found in the Burrup Peninsular are internationally acknowledged as being rich in diversity and intensity.  Rock engravings in the Burrup are subject to natural weathering in an arid and hot climate.

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    Video
    Western Australian Museum