Marine Life

  • 8 Nov 2011

    Tides & Islands – Day 1 – Tidal Reef Walk

    These video diaries document the October 2011 field trip into remote areas of the Kimberley. This field trip was part of the Marine Life of Kimberley project to study and understand the marine biodiversity of the area.

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    Video
    Danny Murphy

  • 8 Nov 2011

    Tides & Islands – Day 1 – What's it all about

    These video diaries document the October 2011 field trip into remote areas of the Kimberley. This field trip was part of the Marine Life of Kimberley project to study and understand the marine biodiversity of the area.

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    Video
    Danny Murphy

  • 15 Jul 2011

    Spines, stings and shocks – Dangerous marine animals

    Corey Whisson, Technical Officer, Aquatic Zoology

    Many species in the marine environment have ways of protecting themselves that may hurt their foes, for example spines, poisons and venoms, or very large teeth. Hear about some of these organisms and the stories associated with their lifestyles in the sea.

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    Video
    Danny Murphy

  • 23 Jun 2011

    Creature Feature - Haunted Beaches: The fleet-footed Ghost Crabs

    If you’ve ever walked along the many miles of beach in Western Australia, you may have seen large burrows high up on the shore, near the high tide line and beyond into the dunes. During the day you would be unlikely to find the animal responsible for these, unless you carried out some serious excavating yourself. At dusk, however, you may see the culprits emerge.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • A colour peacock shrimp resting on the ocean floor

    8 Feb 2011

    Creature Feature: Peacock Mantis Shrimp

    Fight Club: the Peacock Mantis Shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus (Linneaus, 1758)

    Mantis Shrimp belong to a group of crustaceans, called stomatopods, only distantly related to shrimps and prawns you would normally see on your dinner plate. They get their common name from the enlarged second limb, referred to as the claw, which is very reminiscent of the front legs of the praying mantis. Much like the praying mantis in your back garden, mantis shrimp also use these limbs for capturing prey, with which they launch lightning fast attacks.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • A large crab with very long stalked eyes

    5 Nov 2010

    Creature Feature: long-eyed swimmer crab

    Podophthalmus vigil (Fabricius, 1798), the long-eyed swimmer crab.

    There are approximately 100 species of swimming or paddle crabs in Australian waters, the most familiar being the tasty blue swimmer and mud crabs. The remarkable long-eyed swimmer crab is easily identified by its enormously long eye stalks – a feature not seen in any other species of Australian swimming crab. The long-eyed swimmer crab is found in shallow sandy or muddy areas in tropical regions of the Indo-Pacific, having been found from the Red Sea, South Africa to Japan and Hawaii.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • 26 Oct 2010

    Marine Life of the Kimberley Region - Day 7

    When the Western Australian Museum goes exploring and cataloguing the remote waters of the Kimberley region, you can be with us in real time.

    The ninth video in this series documents the seventh day of the research expedition. In this video Andrew Hosie talks about a unique barnacle which has invaded a blue swimmer crab and is living off the crab's blood supply.

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    Video
    Danny Murphy

  • 30 Sep 2010

    Darwin's animals: Barnacles

    Diana Jones Executive Director, Collection and Content Development

    Charles Darwin formulated his ideas of evolution through his study of barnacles. Today we are living in the Age of Barnacles. They occur from estuaries to the deepest depths of the ocean.

    Join Diana Jones as she discusses the diverse world of Darwin's "beloved barnacles", their beauty, the potential threat to their habitats, and their uses in forensic medicine, dentistry and the space industry.

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    Video
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image copyright of WA Museum

    31 Aug 2010

    Creature Feature: The Japanese Shame-Faced Crab

    The Japanese Shame-Faced Crab, Calappa japonica Ortmann, 1892.

    The Japanese shame-faced crab was originally discovered in Tokyo Bay, Japan but has since been found as far away as Africa and can be found in depths up to ~250 m. This spectacular red and yellow crab was first reported in Western Australia only as recently as 1989 when crayfishers, off Rottnest Island, caught an unfortunate specimen in a craypot. The specimen in the photos was collected this year, near Ningaloo reef in 230 m.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • 23 Aug 2010

    Collecting marine life in the Kimberley

    Clay Bryce Senior Project Officer, Aquatic Zoology

    Since 1976 the WA Museum has been investigating the marine fauna in the Kimberley creating an immense body of marine biodiversity knowledge for the region. This research has continued to the present day.

    Join Clay Bryce on a journey that will take you from historic biological collecting practices through to today's modern methods. And all this done in the sometimes hair-raising territory of sharks and crocodiles!

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    Video
    Western Australian Museum

  • Image copyright of WA Museum

    15 Jul 2010

    Darwin’s Opera House Barnacle - species of the month

    Calantica darwini Jones & Hosie, 2009

    Described and named only last year, these tiny stalked barnacles are only known from the deep water off the coast of north Western Australia and are easily overlooked due to their small size (<1 cm in height!) and their habit of attaching to the branches of deep sea corals. With a bit of imagination, a cluster of these tiny barnacles resembles the Sydney Opera House, hence their common name.

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    Blog entry
    Western Australian Museum

  • 25 May 2010

    Marine life of the Northwest

    Andrew Hosie Curator, Aquatic Zoology

    Commercial and tourism interest in the Dampier Archipelago, Northwest Atolls and the Kimberley is at an all time high. Understanding what lives in the Northwest has never been more important.

    Join Andrew Hosie as he talks about the major biodiversity research that has been conducted by the Museum over the last decade, and the many species that have been discovered that were previously unknown in WA or to science.

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    Video
    Western Australian Museum

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