Liaising with the Great Southern

Article | Updated 4 weeks ago

Lindsay Dean and Shona Coyne have been engaged as Community Liaison Officers in the Great Southern region.

Community Liaison Officer engagements focus on projects being developed for the New Museum in collaboration with Aboriginal communities.

 

What a wonderful opportunity to showcase our culture, people and Dreaming stories in the Great Southern.


Lindsay Dean 2017

Lindsay and Shona will be working with Aboriginal communities in the Great Southern region to provide advice and guidance on how stories from the region are shared in the New Museum. They will also support collaborative projects in the region for New Museum Project and the Museum of the Great Southern in Albany.

Dual images show portraits of Shona Coyne (left) and Lindsay Dean (right)

Image copyright WA Museum

The WA Museum consulted with the Albany Aboriginal Heritage Reference Group Aboriginal Corporation to gain endorsement for projects in the Great Southern and the appointment of Shona and Lindsay.

They will be based in the Great Southern region and will be working in the roles until the end of the year.

There will be further appointments of Community Liaison Officers around the state as project develops.

Projects in the Great Southern Region

If you have stories that you would like to share with the WA Museum please contact the Museum of the Great Southern (08) 9841 4844 to speak with Shona or Lindsay.

Lindsay will be working with community to develop stories about:

  • Dreaming narratives, in particular the cultural and natural significance of the Stirling Range, Bluff Knoll and Dingo Dreaming; and
  • The cultural significance and meaning of ochre to the Aboriginal peoples of the Great Southern, especially the Wickinellup ochre pit.

Shona will be working with community to develop stories about:

  • The cultural significance and meaning of the Oyster Harbour fish traps to the Menang and wider community; 
  • Contemporary perspectives of experiences of the arrival of strangers to Country and how and/ or if, those experiences continue to manifest themselves in culture and tradition today; and
  • Thoughts of feelings about the recent Yurlmun: Mokare Mia Boodja exhibition and what it means for local people, as well as the impact of past collecting practices.