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Renae Woodhams
Wed, 02/03/2016 - 19:15 post

Carnotaurus on the move

CLICK these videos to see how we move a dinosaur! 

Today our Carnotaurus dinosaur ‘Betty’ was moved from the Perth site and taken to the Collections and Research Centre for safe storage as we prepare for the New Museum for WA.

Betty is the biggest object we are moving as part of the temporary closure.  We are in the process of progressively moving objects from our Perth site to our Welshpool Collections and Research Centre as we prepare for the New Museum, which will open in 2020.  

We need to move the collections and temporarily close the Perth site because the New Museum is a major construction project and we want to ensure our collections, staff and visitors are safe while building takes place.   

The Museum’s Perth site is still open until June 2016  and A History of the World In 100 Objects is opening on 13 February and should not be missed! We also have lots of fabulous activities and exhibitions at our other sites including the Da Vinci Machines exhibition which is on display at the WA Maritime Museum now.   

While we develop the New Museum you can still visit our other five sites; WA Maritime Museum, WA Museum - Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle and our regional sites in Albany, Geraldton and Kalgoorlie-Boulder.  Plus keep an eye out for the Museum in surprising places as we pop up throughout the State! 

#newmuseumforwa #revealingthemuseum #bigpicperth 

Note: there is no audio with these videos

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New Museum
Mon, 02/01/2016 - 14:20 post

The WA Museum - Perth is changing

CLICK on this video to hear from our CEO Alec Coles about the exciting changes to the WA Museum - Perth as we prepare for the New Museum for WA.

Transcript

We’re developing a New Museum for Western Australia here in the Perth Cultural Centre because we want to create a Museum that’s owned, used and valued by all Western Australians and admired by the world.

We believe that WA deserves that, and we’ve got so many extraordinary stories to tell in this State, we want the world to hear them.

We believe this is one of the most significant museum redevelopments in the world today. It’s got a value of over 400 million Australian dollars. So it’s a huge project, and in order to make it happen we’re going to have to close this site and pass it over to a contractor.

That means the Museum will be closed for something like four years. Over that period we have to get all the collections off site so they’ll be safe and won’t be affected by the significant development that will be happening here. It also means it would be quite unsafe for people to visit, so that’s why we have to close it.

But the good news is the WA Museum is not one museum, it is many sites. We’ve got another five sites that will be enhancing their programs – two in Fremantle, one in Kalgoorlie, one in Geraldton and one in Albany. Over that period you’ll be able to visit all those museums and they’ll be doing great things, but at the same time you’ll see the WA Museum popping up in all kinds of unexpected places.

So don’t think for a minute that we’ve gone away, as we plan for a very big future.

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New Museum
Tue, 12/29/2015 - 14:30 post

#revealingthemuseum – unlucky prospector

These items belonged to Ernest Maurice. After the death of his parents and brother, he turned his sights to gold and travelled from England to Western Australia to try his luck at prospecting.

Sadly, the 19-year-old contracted typhoid and never made it to the goldfields in the north of WA. He died on 26 July 1891 in the Perth Colonial Hospital. His death eerily echoed that of his brother who died in 1888 in New Zealand, also aged 19, possibly while also in the pursuit of gold.

After his death, Ernest’s only living relative at the time, his older sister, received his effects (£444 2s. 11d.) However, the items he had in his possession at the time of his death never made it back to her, having been lodged with the Supreme Court and presumably forgotten. They were found by chance by Perth historian Dr Tom Stannage and donated to the Western Australian Museum.

Click here to watch a short video of Western Australian Museum History Curator Joanne Hyland describe Ernest Maurice’s story.

Some of Ernest’s personal possessions have been on display in Hackett Hall at the WA Museum – Perth. As part of the preparations for building work for the New Museum for WA, the valuable and historically significant objects from Hackett Hall are being moved to safe storage. The heritage building will be incorporated into the New Museum’s design, which is due to open in 2020. http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/content/new-museum-project

You’re invited to share your #faveobjects and memories at: http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/groups/new-museum

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Renae Woodhams
Sun, 12/20/2015 - 11:52 post

Renae Woodhams's picture

Renae Woodhams
Mon, 12/14/2015 - 11:02 post

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New Museum
Thu, 12/03/2015 - 16:56 post

Throwback Thursday – January 1888

Jimmy Withnell picked up this stone near Roebourne in January 1888 to throw at a crow, which had spilt the flour for his damper. As the 19-year-old threw the stone, he noticed the glint of gold.

Jimmy quickly found more nuggets in the same area. They were taken to Roebourne’s Resident Magistrate Colonel Edward Fox Angelo who sent a telegram to Colonial Secretary Sir Malcolm Fraser: "Jimmy Withnell picked up a stone to throw at a crow seeing it glitter discovered gold stated to run very rich at mallina station peewar river thirty miles from forrester island" (sic). According to legend only the first line of the telegram, "Jimmy Withnell picked up a stone to throw at a crow", was received in Perth so the reply came back "... and what became of the crow?". 

The telegraph is held in the State Archives Acc 527 File 244/1888. The finding of the nugget led to the discovery of the first payable goldfields in the North West.

Quartz gold-bearing nugget on display in Hackett Hall

This quartz gold-bearing nugget has been on display in Hackett Hall at the WA Museum – Perth. As part of the preparations for building work for the New Museum for WA, the valuable and historically significant objects currently on display in Hackett Hall are being moved to safe storage. The heritage building will be incorporated into the New Museum’s design, which is due to open in 2020. http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/content/new-museum-project 

You’re invited to share your #faveobjects and memories at: http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/groups/new-museum

WA Museum History Curator Joanne Hyland holding a quartz gold-bearing nugget

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New Museum
Wed, 12/02/2015 - 13:20 post

#faveobjects convict ticket-of-leave

WA Museum History Curator Joanne Hyland’s #faveobjects nomination is the convict ticket-of-leave from Hackett Hall at the WA Museum – Perth.

“I have a long-standing interest in WA convict history which started when I began researching my own family history. For my History Honours I chose the subject of why no female convicts were brought out to Western Australia despite political pressure to do so.

A ticket-of-leave, such as this one for George Battersby, was quite often provided to the convicts as they arrived on Western Australian shores. Generally they had already served half of their allotted prison time before being transported and were considered ready to be put to work. The ticket-of-leave indicated the areas in which a convict was permitted to work and also the employers they were working for. It had to be carried on the person at all times. This ticket-of-leave also has a physical description of George (5’ 3’’, brown hair, blue eyes, fair complexion) and details about his age (57).

The ticket-of-leave is dated 14 January 1879. It shows that he worked for R. Clarke of Fremantle, H. Albert of Fremantle, Fred Gibson (Victoria), James Heanlan (Victoria) and James Smith (Victoria).

Convicts were brought out to Western Australia from June 1850 until 1868 when transportation ceased.”

Convict ticket-of-leave on display at the WA Museum - Perth

As part of the preparations for building work for the New Museum for WA, the valuable and historically significant objects currently on display in Hackett Hall are being moved to safe storage. The heritage building will be incorporated into the New Museum’s design, which is due to open in 2020. http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/content/new-museum-project

You’re invited to share your #faveobjects and memories at: http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/groups/new-museum

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New Museum
Mon, 11/30/2015 - 16:39 post

#revealingthemuseum exposing 3D fish fossils

Unique Gogo fish specimens dating back about 380 million years found in the Kimberley reveal amazing amounts of information to Western Australian Museum palaeontologists and other scientists from all over the world.

Gogo concretions (limestone nodules which formed around fish skeletons) preserve fossils extremely well in their original 3D shapes. What’s more, a fossil fish skeleton is quite resistant to weak acids.

Palaeontologists take advantage of this and use acids to slowly dissolve Gogo concretions, exposing the fish skeletons trapped inside. This process takes several months and involves repeated cycles of acid digestion, rinsing, drying and application of a stabiliser.

Some Gogo fish specimens have phosphatised soft tissue preserved such as muscle fibres and, in one example, the umbilical cord!

Our knowledge of this group of extinct vertebrates has improved dramatically in recent years as a result of studies based on the world-class Gogo material found at a reef complex along the north-eastern margin of the Canning Basin in the Kimberley.

One particularly well-preserved placoderm fish fossil from this region is pictured here. It was discovered in 1986 by Dr John Long and was formally described in 1995 and named Mcnamaraspis kaprios, in honour of another palaeontologist, Dr Kenneth McNamara.

Later in 1995 it was selected as the State Fossil Emblem for Western Australia.

Sutherland Dianella Primary School initiated a campaign for Western Australia to have Australia’s first state fossil emblem.

In December 1995 Mcnamaraspis kaprios was proclaimed WA’s State Fossil Emblem and it also soon became the school’s emblem.

Renae Woodhams's picture

Renae Woodhams
Wed, 02/03/2016 - 19:15 post

Carnotaurus on the move

CLICK these videos to see how we move a dinosaur! 

Today our Carnotaurus dinosaur ‘Betty’ was moved from the Perth site and taken to the Collections and Research Centre for safe storage as we prepare for the New Museum for WA.

Betty is the biggest object we are moving as part of the temporary closure.  We are in the process of progressively moving objects from our Perth site to our Welshpool Collections and Research Centre as we prepare for the New Museum, which will open in 2020.  

We need to move the collections and temporarily close the Perth site because the New Museum is a major construction project and we want to ensure our collections, staff and visitors are safe while building takes place.   

The Museum’s Perth site is still open until June 2016  and A History of the World In 100 Objects is opening on 13 February and should not be missed! We also have lots of fabulous activities and exhibitions at our other sites including the Da Vinci Machines exhibition which is on display at the WA Maritime Museum now.   

While we develop the New Museum you can still visit our other five sites; WA Maritime Museum, WA Museum - Shipwreck Galleries in Fremantle and our regional sites in Albany, Geraldton and Kalgoorlie-Boulder.  Plus keep an eye out for the Museum in surprising places as we pop up throughout the State! 

#newmuseumforwa #revealingthemuseum #bigpicperth 

Note: there is no audio with these videos

New Museum's picture

New Museum
Mon, 02/01/2016 - 14:20 post

The WA Museum - Perth is changing

CLICK on this video to hear from our CEO Alec Coles about the exciting changes to the WA Museum - Perth as we prepare for the New Museum for WA.

Transcript

We’re developing a New Museum for Western Australia here in the Perth Cultural Centre because we want to create a Museum that’s owned, used and valued by all Western Australians and admired by the world.

We believe that WA deserves that, and we’ve got so many extraordinary stories to tell in this State, we want the world to hear them.

We believe this is one of the most significant museum redevelopments in the world today. It’s got a value of over 400 million Australian dollars. So it’s a huge project, and in order to make it happen we’re going to have to close this site and pass it over to a contractor.

That means the Museum will be closed for something like four years. Over that period we have to get all the collections off site so they’ll be safe and won’t be affected by the significant development that will be happening here. It also means it would be quite unsafe for people to visit, so that’s why we have to close it.

But the good news is the WA Museum is not one museum, it is many sites. We’ve got another five sites that will be enhancing their programs – two in Fremantle, one in Kalgoorlie, one in Geraldton and one in Albany. Over that period you’ll be able to visit all those museums and they’ll be doing great things, but at the same time you’ll see the WA Museum popping up in all kinds of unexpected places.

So don’t think for a minute that we’ve gone away, as we plan for a very big future.

New Museum's picture

New Museum
Tue, 12/29/2015 - 14:30 post

#revealingthemuseum – unlucky prospector

These items belonged to Ernest Maurice. After the death of his parents and brother, he turned his sights to gold and travelled from England to Western Australia to try his luck at prospecting.

Sadly, the 19-year-old contracted typhoid and never made it to the goldfields in the north of WA. He died on 26 July 1891 in the Perth Colonial Hospital. His death eerily echoed that of his brother who died in 1888 in New Zealand, also aged 19, possibly while also in the pursuit of gold.

After his death, Ernest’s only living relative at the time, his older sister, received his effects (£444 2s. 11d.) However, the items he had in his possession at the time of his death never made it back to her, having been lodged with the Supreme Court and presumably forgotten. They were found by chance by Perth historian Dr Tom Stannage and donated to the Western Australian Museum.

Click here to watch a short video of Western Australian Museum History Curator Joanne Hyland describe Ernest Maurice’s story.

Some of Ernest’s personal possessions have been on display in Hackett Hall at the WA Museum – Perth. As part of the preparations for building work for the New Museum for WA, the valuable and historically significant objects from Hackett Hall are being moved to safe storage. The heritage building will be incorporated into the New Museum’s design, which is due to open in 2020. http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/content/new-museum-project

You’re invited to share your #faveobjects and memories at: http://museum.wa.gov.au/community/groups/new-museum

Renae Woodhams's picture

Renae Woodhams
Sun, 12/20/2015 - 11:52 post

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New Museum
Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:46 news

Temporary closure of the Play Space

Child playing the xylophone

The Play Space in the Perth Cultural Centre will be undergoing maintenance in mid-June while heritage conservation works are conducted on the facade of the Museum, in preparation for the New Museum

From next week, 9 June, the Play Space will be closed for a few months and the Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority will be taking the opportunity to conduct some maintenance on the instruments and equipment.

While it is closed, why not come into the Museum and explore our galleries and Discovery Centre?  We're still open and there is lots to see and do. 

For information on when the Play Space will re-open keep an eye on the Perth Cultural Centre website. 

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New Museum
Wed, 11/26/2014 - 07:24 news

Contractors invited to submit interest to design, construct New Museum

The New Museum for Western Australia reached a major milestone today with the State Government inviting local and international contractors to submit expressions of interest (EOI) to design and construct the New Museum in the Perth Cultural Centre.

The New Museum will open to the public in 2020 with a landmark new building that integrates with the heritage buildings. This invitation is the first step in the procurement process to develop the new facility.

This is a momentous time for WA as we develop a Museum that will share the stories of our people and places from around this vast State.

You can be a part of it. Have your say.  Share your story.  We want to hear from you. 

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